Google Glass continue to cause a stir; invasive or inventive seems to be the general theme. The way this product is being marketed is to create the perception that this will be the next giant step in technological development. Those images people have of the future, hover boards and Star Trek like glasses, pose questions a plenty.

Firstly we have the legal debate of privacy. The glasses can film, take pictures and record sound creating the problem of knowing whether these devices are being used illegally. For example a middle aged man stood outside a primary school with a video recorder or mobile phone filming would soon be confronted but how do the general public recognise such actions with the glass?
This leads us onto the second debate which is morality. It’s questionable as to whether this development sits within the boundaries as to what is commonly viewed as acceptable in today’s society. The fear of the unknown is common and how comfortable would you feel speaking to somebody with the glasses on? Knowing you could be filmed or recorded against your will. The wearers seem to be willingly alienating themselves the common man which surely cannot be of benefit.

The final debate is to whether we actually need these glasses? Are they welcome, are they wanted? What purpose do they serve other than to allow Google to advertise 24/7? Surely the fact that Google can now track exactly where you are, at what time can allow them to tailor their advertising to the precise point i.e. if you are walking down Market St. at 7:30am on a Monday your high street coffee shops investing in AdWords will have a field day.

So is this the whole point? For Google to make more money through advertising?

The approach of Google to the customer doesn’t seem to be overly welcoming. Just today we have had the news that if you should install Apps or software then wish to cancel your changes and revert back to factory settings that this could potentially see the product obsolete. This avoids refunds, support query time, general customer service; if it’s broke then that’s that it just get’s rewritten into a state in which it was never supplied.

Amidst a week of the questionable Penguin 2.0 update, the minimising tax payments matters in the UK rumble on, and the controversial Google Glass release and their dialogue being released around the development; Google certainly is a talking point.. no PR is bad PR they say.